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Office blog

How Medications Affect Your Dental Health

If you're taking medications for certain health conditions, it may not have crossed your mind that they can also impact your oral health. After all, medications are supposed to bring equilibrium back to your system, not stir things up, right? Truth is a variety of prescribed medications can affect your teeth. 

Antihistamines may cause dry mouth syndrome, which can lead to sore gums, making the mouth more prone to infection. Contraceptives and blood pressure medications may cause mouth sores, gum inflammation and discoloration.

The Impact of an Impacted Tooth

The Impact of an Impacted Tooth

A tooth is considered impacted when it only partially grows through the gums. This can happen because another tooth blocks it, or it grows in crookedly. The third molar typically erupts from age 17 to 21 and is the last tooth to appear, which is why it's the most likely tooth to become impacted - there's usually no room left for it. 

Although an impacted tooth does not always lead to pain or discomfort, the impaction can cause other problems. A partially erupted tooth can create an opening in the gum where food and other particles can accumulate, leading to gum infection.

Jaw Tightness and Tension: What Does It Mean?

When you have tightness or tension in your jaw, it can be uncomfortable to say the least. You could be experiencing pain in your neck and throat as well as your jaw. You could also have trouble opening your mouth all the way, or it may even be impossible for you to do this. You may even have symptoms that don’t appear to have anything to do with your jaw, including headaches or ear infections. What does all this mean? Here are the top three things your jaw tightness and tension may be pointing to!

Smokers More Likely to Need Root Canals

It's never fun to hear the words "root canal" coming out of your dentist's mouth. But if you've recently been diagnosed as needing a root canal treatment, it may be comforting to know that you're not alone. Like you, it's estimated that about half of the adult population in the U.S. will need a root canal treatment by the age of 50.The good news is if you don't smoke you can avoid increasing your chances of needing a root canal. If you do smoke, you may be surprised to learn about the recent dental health findings at Boston University's Goldman School of Dental Medicine.

Chaparral Village Dental has been selected for the 2018 Best of Temecula Awards for Dentistry.


The Aging Mouth: What’s Normal, What’s Not?

If you're like most seniors, you know that some changes to your body are a normal part of the aging process and others aren't. The same applies to your dental health. That's right, the health of your teeth matters as you age, too! So it's easy to understand why you might be wondering what changes are normal and what might signal something more serious.

What to ExpectThe natural process of aging takes its toll on your teeth and mouth just as it does your body. Here are some common oral health changes seniors can anticipate:

A Step-by-Step Flossing Guide for Kids

Regular tooth brushing and flossing are important for maintaining healthy teeth and gums. The best way to insure that your child maintains good oral health through adulthood is to establish their oral hygiene routine early.

You can start teaching your child to floss when they are 2 or 3 years old. They will require supervision and assistance until they are about 8 years old, but establishing regular flossing habits will put them ahead of the dental health game as they grow up.

Flossing is important for removing the dental plaque trapped between teeth and along the gum line that a toothbrush cannot usually reach.

Seniors at Higher Risk for Dental Cavities

You may think that as an adult you don't have to worry about cavities anymore -- but dental cavities aren't just child's play!

As we entered the new millennium, it was discovered that seniors were actually getting more dental cavities than children. Today, children and seniors are still the two highest at-risk groups for tooth decay.

Aging puts us at greater risk for dental problems -- the wearing away of tooth enamel, receding gums and loss of jawbone are signs that our mouths are aging along with our bodies.

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How do dentists detect and treat hidden tooth decay